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Topic with many replies

Is it 2011 yet?


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Written on: 16.07.2010 13:30
worthyraver
Posts: 8
I recently got back from Glastonbury, been there every year since 2007 I have also done a few other UK based festivals. I am determined to make it to Roskilde either next year or more likely the year after that, as that year (2013) Glastonbury has a fallow year ie a year off, which would make it less of killer journey and also would give me the chance to get there from the very start.

I post regularly on a Glastonbury message board, and having read though a few pages of posts on here the similarly between the two is evident straight away all the same questions come up on both boards ALL the time:

Where should I camp?
When should I get there?
Can I take beers into the arena?

I have not yet seen the "How strict are the searches?" question but I am sure it is on here somewhere icon_wink.gif

I am guessing some of you must have been over to Glastonbury and I am interested to what you would think are the main differences, from what I have read there are some obvious ones:

Glastonbury:
No arena, once you are in you are in, drink your own beer anywhere.
More than a music festival, over 80 stages cabaret circus etc.
Late night areas are to be seen to be believed a whole new world springs up out of a field.
No or little rock music: Pendulum / Fucked up played in 2009, RATM played in 1994 I think, but not enough by a long way.
Sheer scale of the place is its biggest advantage and disadvantage in one go.

Roskilde:
In a more urban environment so easy to pop to the shop to buy some more beer.
Sounds systems allowed almost encouraged in the campsites.
Not very if at all children/family friendly.

Glastonbury and Roskilde:
Both kick off before any music starts, more so of Roskilde.
Both biggest in Europe/ World of their type.
Both have friendly reputations, not sure about the tent burning on the last night in Roskilde though, this sounds a bit like a festival in the UK called Reading which has a bad reputation for the same thing.

I am guessing whichever festival you have recently got back from, be that Glastonbury or Roskilde you may be feeling a little bit fed up waiting for next year to come around, you can always try to ease the pain by visiting "other" festivals, but they are never the same and gives the feeling you are cheating on your true love, still dont stop you going though does it?

Hopefully see some of you next year or the year after, (or both)
Written on: 16.07.2010 14:40
Kaneda
Posts: 382
worthyraver wrote:

I have not yet seen the "How strict are the searches?" question but I am sure it is on here somewhere icon_wink.gif


The searches mostly aren't strict at all. Mostly just patting your pockets, and checking your bag if you're carrying one.

More than a music festival, over 80 stages cabaret circus etc.


Roskilde likes to emphasize "more than music", but it's much less than Glastonbury - especially so in 2010. I've complained about that elsewhere. The camping area has a good amount of offers, though - cinema, skating and other street sports, spoken word etc. It varies from year to year. In general, the "more than music" aspects (art, decorations, performances, activities) are more "urban" than Glastonbury.

And don't come to Roskilde for the scenic landscape. icon_wink.gif

Late night areas are to be seen to be believed a whole new world springs up out of a field.


I'd say it's the same at Roskilde, although differently. icon_smile.gif Both the festival area and camp site have a very special kind of (mostly gritty) beauty after dark.

No or little rock music: Pendulum / Fucked up played in 2009, RATM played in 1994 I think, but not enough by a long way.


I believe Glastonbury are being relatively conservative about booking - when I was there, I heard it described as a "security measure". I.e., don't book bands that "rile up" the audience.

Still, I don't think Roskilde has enough "real" rock music either - anymore. It's being diluted by the Pitchfork readers and indie-pop fans, hiphop, DJ sets etc. I rarely say so, because that's a rather controversial opinion by now. icon_wink.gif But quite frankly, it's more mainstream and pop-ish than it was just a few years ago.

Still, it has more rock than Glastonbury.

And a fair percentage of the names will be the same, since the Roskilde booking team work together with the Eavis's when booking bands - in order to make it more feasible for bands to visit Northern Europe.

Sheer scale of the place is its biggest advantage and disadvantage in one go.


Agreed. Considering the amount of guests Roskilde lets in, the (lack of) scale of the place was its biggest disadvantage this year. Most years, though, it has been just about right, and I've preferred it to the vastness of Glastonbury.

Sounds systems allowed almost encouraged in the campsites.


Yeah, but they've set some limits lately - although I don't think those have really been enforced in most cases.

Not very if at all children/family friendly.


That's a matter of opinion. I'd agree, but I still know of people bringing their toddlers. Personally, I think Roskilde is more friendly in general, but I wouldn't call it child friendly. And the festival certainly doesn't encourage bringing children.

Both kick off before any music starts, more so of Roskilde.

MUCH more so - it's considered as important (or more, if you ask some) as the actual music part.

Might also note that a lot more effort is put into a lot of the camps at Roskilde. Making the camping part a lot more fun than Glastonbury - even if you camp outside the festival area (or maybe because of that).

Both biggest in Europe/ World of their type.

It's a matter of how you count in the case of most other festivals, but no matter how you count, Glastonbury is bigger. Roskilde has around 105,000 participants each day (including volunteers, artists and media). Glastonbury around 170,000 these days, I believe, although they're less open about how many volunteers etc.

Both have friendly reputations, not sure about the tent burning on the last night in Roskilde though, this sounds a bit like a festival in the UK called Reading which has a bad reputation for the same thing.


Nah, while the "devils' night" is not good for sleeping without someone guarding your tent, it's nowhere near Reading - especially in recent years, it's been relatively quiet and well controlled.

Crime-wise, much less than Glastonbury from what I can tell. Thievery varies (and a lot of the forum users here are trying to tell the festival management exactly why that is). Mostly there are one or two cases of violence reported to the police. It's commonly said (and mostly true) that there's less violence in the course of the week at the festival than in the city of Roskilde over a typical weekend (Roskilde's population is about half the size of the festival).

I am guessing whichever festival you have recently got back from, be that Glastonbury or Roskilde you may be feeling a little bit fed up waiting for next year to come around, you can always try to ease the pain by visiting "other" festivals, but they are never the same and gives the feeling you are cheating on your true love, still dont stop you going though does it?


I don't bother with other rock festivals anymore - and I've been to a lot of them. Roskilde is my #1, Glastonbury #2. No others (and I mean none) come close. icon_smile.gif

A few more differences:

Orange stage and Arena have had closed front stage pits (with barriers) since the accident in 2000. This means that if you want to be at front stage, you'll need to queue for the more popular acts (still, you could easily get into the pits 10 minutes before Muse went on stage, without queuing - in spite of people having done so for four hours). In general, it's much easier to get close to the stages at Roskilde.

That also means that Roskilde has an easy way to limit banners in front of the largest stages - they're simply not allowed in the pits, causing them to be more spread out since they're further from the stages. It's never been the problem here that it's become at Glastonbury.

(Please note that everything I say may be coloured by me having been at Glastonbury twice while I've been at Roskilde since 1993 when I was 15 icon_wink.gif).

Hopefully see some of you next year or the year after, (or both)


Looking forward to it - the more foreigners at Roskilde, the better icon_smile.gif

[This article was edited 9 times, at last 16.07.2010 at 16:09.]
Written on: 16.07.2010 16:52
worthyraver
Posts: 8
Kaneda wrote:


I believe Glastonbury are being relatively conservative about booking - when I was there, I heard it described as a "security measure". i.e., don't book bands that "rile up" the audience.


Michael Eavis still uses that as an excuse not to book any "proper" rock bands, he still quotes the tragedy that occurred in Roskilde during Pearl Jam in 2000 as an reason for this, despite all safety measure having changed at Glastonbury Roskilde and any other decent sized event you care to mention, the bottom line is he just does not like them. I would love for Metallica to headline Glastonbury, they would go down a storm, and they are on record as saying they would do it, just can not see it happening though, which is a shame. It is the one area of music that is under represented at Glastonbury, if you dont include Classical and Country and Western!!!!

Still, I don't think Roskilde has enough "real" rock music either - anymore. It's being diluted by the Pitchfork readers and indie-pop fans, hiphop, DJ sets etc. I rarely say so, because that's a rather controversial opinion by now. icon_wink.gif But quite frankly, it's more mainstream and pop-ish than it was just a few years ago.


You no doubt have a point, in recent years you have had The Chemical Brothers, not that I would complain about that you understand I was second row for Orbital at Glastonbury a few weeks ago. icon_eek.gif

Still, it has more rock than Glastonbury.


Yeah by 500%

And a fair percentage of the names will be the same, since the Roskilde booking team work together with the Eavis's when booking bands - in order to make it more feasible for bands to visit Northern Europe.


I had no idea this happened, makes sense I guess, cant see them fighting over a Metallica exclusive though.

MUCH more so - it's considered as important (or more, if you ask some) as the actual music part.


In fact Glastonbury are putting music on earlier and earlier, I preferred it when all there was to do on the Wednesday and Thursday was drink cider in a field, it was almost a secret it opened early as it was advertised from the Friday. However that changed in 2009 and they advertised it as a five day festival and now too many people turn up on the Wednesday Thursday and have "spoilt" it, never mind.

Orange stage and Arena have had closed front stage pits (with barriers) since the accident in 2000. This means that if you want to be at front stage, you'll need to queue for the more popular acts (still, you could easily get into the pits 10 minutes before Muse went on stage, without queueing - in spite of people having done so for four hours). In general, it's much easier to get close to the stages at Roskilde.


Glastonbury run a similar system in front of the Pyramid stage, as do most festivals.

That also means that Roskilde has an easy way to limit banners in front of the largest stages - they're simply not allowed in the pits, causing them to be more spread out since they're further from the stages. It's never been the problem here that it's become at Glastonbury.


I hate fecking flags /banners pet hate, they were supposed to be banned in front of the sound desk I believe this year, that made feck all difference, maybe not quite as bad as last year which was ridiculous

I will see you at Roskilde soon, when were you last at Glastonbury?
Written on: 16.07.2010 19:12
Kaneda
Posts: 382
worthyraver wrote:
he still quotes the tragedy that occurred in Roskilde during Pearl Jam in 2000 as an reason for this

Yeah, that's what I heard. And it makes no sense. It's overreacting. This said by someone who was there - and quite too close to it. Saying anything about this asks for controversy, but I truly see no conceptual difference between Pearl Jam at Orange in 2000 and, say, Muse or Orbital at Pyramid in 2010 - other than the security measures implemented since then. Eavis cannot predict that this will happen with one band and not another.

Just a few years ago I thought differently about the causes (which I won't go into here) of what happened that night, but it's always been evident to me that it had absolutely nothing to do with what band was playing - other than Pearl Jam being immensely popular. So, stop booking popular bands would be a better strategy... icon_confused.gif

You no doubt have a point, in recent years you have had The Chemical Brothers, not that I would complain about that you understand I was second row for Orbital at Glastonbury a few weeks ago. icon_eek.gif


I would have been third. icon_wink.gif Especially if I'd known they'd play their best version of "Doctor?" ever (although they also played it at Roskilde in 1999) - and with Matt Smith as guest-star-doing-nothing-in-particular-other-than-standing-there... icon_smile.gif I have nothing against any genre (except hiphop) - would just prefer to see Roskilde go back to more emphasis on rock. And not as much of the Pitchfork variety...

Besides, Roskilde has been more varied than it is now - there was a Cabaret stage (with both performances and music) in the 90's - as well as stages (two of them in the late 90's) dedicated to electronic music of all kinds. Actually, The Chemical Brothers first played at Roskilde in '95 - didn't see them, though icon_smile.gif Not to mention World Stage (later Ballroom Stage, and even later - in some regards - Astoria) dedicated to world music, which only shut down this year. The music is more spread out on the stages now, with no stage being dedicated to any particular genre.

But still, even in the super-varied 90's, rock was the emphasis.

I had no idea this happened, makes sense I guess, cant see them fighting over a Metallica exclusive though.


Doubtful. icon_smile.gif Must say we didn't go there for the music programme either year.

Glastonbury run a similar system in front of the Pyramid stage, as do most festivals.


Really? Never noticed it - but then, we only saw two concerts at Pyramid in 2004 and only arrived when there were already as many people as when Orange stage is filled to the brim. icon_wink.gif I knew there was a barrier in front, but somehow got into my head that it was simply a straight barrier parallel to the stage - not closed. So always wondered how the hell they justified security, when every other festival implemented such a system.

I hate fecking flags /banners pet hate, they were supposed to be banned in front of the sound desk I believe this year, that made feck all difference, maybe not quite as bad as last year which was ridiculous


I did ponder how they were supposed to enforce that, without any queue system for the front (but now I know better). Figured they'd place snipers at strategic positions. icon_wink.gif

I will see you at Roskilde soon, when were you last at Glastonbury?


1999 and 2004 - both Glastonbury/Roskilde marathons - the bit of rain at Glastonbury in 2004 was nothing compared to what waited for us at Roskilde (still glad I wasn't at Glastonbury in 2007, though, or we probably wouldn't have survived Roskilde...).

But what a strange experience to watch Muse on Arena with around 10-15,000 people after Pyramid a week earlier. The last time I saw them in a relatively intimate setting and without their stadium pop rock approach of recent years. icon_rolleyes.gif

[This article was edited 4 times, at last 17.07.2010 at 16:54.]
Written on: 19.07.2010 11:00
worthyraver
Posts: 8
Kaneda wrote:



1999 and 2004 - both Glastonbury/Roskilde marathons - the bit of rain at Glastonbury in 2004 was nothing compared to what waited for us at Roskilde (still glad I wasn't at Glastonbury in 2007, though, or we probably wouldn't have survived Roskilde...).


That is very interesting as if I was to make Roskilde festival next year it would be a Glastonbury/Roskilde marathon. How did you make the journey back to Roskilde, when did you leave Glastonbury when did you manage to get onsite at Roskilde?

I am not as young as I used to be, but still love to have a pop at that.

Glastonbury 2007 was grim for the weather just constant rain and drizzle, with an occasional thunderstorm just to break things up, I left on the Sunday morning.
Written on: 19.07.2010 13:51
Kaneda
Posts: 382
worthyraver wrote:

That is very interesting as if I was to make Roskilde festival next year it would be a Glastonbury/Roskilde marathon. How did you make the journey back to Roskilde, when did you leave Glastonbury when did you manage to get onsite at Roskilde?

I am not as young as I used to be, but still love to have a pop at that.

Glastonbury 2007 was grim for the weather just constant rain and drizzle, with an occasional thunderstorm just to break things up, I left on the Sunday morning.


Roskilde 2007 was probably at least as bad. It was the heaviest rainfall in the festival's 40 year history. Just have a search for "Roskilde 2007" on google image search icon_wink.gif

As for getting from Glastonbury to Roskilde, in 1999 we went by train all the way - Eurostar etc. - and didn't arrive at Roskilde until Wednesday. But then, the camping wasn't quite so raving mad in terms of getting a spot back then *.

Anyway, we took the easy, and not so environmentally friendly, way in 2004 - we went with a friend who lived in London (who was also the one getting the tickets), so we drove there with him.

So, after Glastonbury, we drove off to Gatwick Monday morning, around 10; took a plane around 3 p.m.-ish; arrived in Copenhagen about three hours later (including time difference); went home to get the prepared fresh clothes etc., then went straight to Roskilde by train (that's about a 30 minute trip). Arrived at the gates to the camping area Monday evening around 9 p.m., having left Glastonbury less than 12 hours earlier - and that was a leisurely trip, without much stress.

The rest of the camp had already arrived and set up for us, so no problem getting a spot **. Quite a few beers later, passed out in the tent and had one of the few occassions of managing to sleep until afternoon next day. icon_smile.gif


* On a side note, you might say that Roskilde puts music on earlier and earlier too. In the 90's, what time people arrived for camping was quite unorganized - some arrived on Thursday, some on the Sunday before, some even earlier. In 2000 (as far as I recall), they added the camping stage, with selected unsigned Nordic bands playing from Tuesday and until the festival site opened. Now they use one of the actual festival stages (Pavilion, re-dubbed Pavilion Junior) for that - and it starts Sunday. Although it's more of a bonus than the one thing people arrive early for. icon_wink.gif And of course, now there's an official opening of the camping sites. It used to be Sunday morning, this year it was Saturday evening. I.e., now the camping opens during Glastonbury.

** And don't worry about that in any event - the festival seems to have learned from the shortage of space last year, so there were still plenty of spots even on Thursday. There'll always be a spot - just don't be afraid to ask the volunteers on the camp sites (and be aware that they're volunteers, and often not very well informed, so be prepared to ask more than one person icon_wink.gif)

EDITED to fix bad memory, bad notion of time differences etc.

[This article was edited 2 times, at last 20.07.2010 at 13:34.]
Written on: 19.07.2010 17:27
worthyraver
Posts: 8
Kaneda wrote:


Roskilde 2007 was probably at least as bad. It was the heaviest rainfall in the festival's 40 year history. Just have a search for "Roskilde 2007" on google image search icon_wink.gif

As for getting from Glastonbury to Roskilde, in 1999 we went by train all the way - Eurostar etc. - and didn't arrive at Roskilde until Wednesday. But then, the camping wasn't quite so raving mad in terms of getting a spot back then *.

Anyway, we took the easy, and not so environmentally friendly, way in 2004 - we went with a friend who lived in London (who was also the one getting the tickets), so we drove there with him.

So, after Glastonbury, we drove off to Gatwick Monday morning, around 10; took a plane around 3 p.m.-ish; arrived in Copenhagen about an hour later; went home to get the prepared fresh clothes etc., then went straight to Roskilde by train (that's about a 30 minute trip). Arrived at the gates to the camping area Monday evening around 9 p.m., having left Glastonbury less than 12 hours earlier - and that was a leisurely trip, without much stress.

The rest of the camp had already arrived and set up for us, so no problem getting a spot **. Quite a few beers later, passed out in the tent and had one of the few occassions of managing to sleep until afternoon next day. icon_smile.gif


* On a side note, you might say that Roskilde puts music on earlier and earlier too. In the 90's, what time people arrived for camping was quite unorganized - some arrived on Thursday, some on the Sunday before, some even earlier. In 2000 (as far as I recall), they added the camping stage, with selected unsigned Nordic bands playing from Tuesday and until the festival site opened. Now they use one of the actual festival stages (Pavilion, re-dubbed Pavilion Junior) for that - and it starts Sunday. Although it's more of a bonus than the one thing people arrive early for. icon_wink.gif And of course, now there's an official opening of the camping sites. It used to be Sunday morning, this year it was Saturday evening. I.e., now the camping opens during Glastonbury.

** And don't worry about that in any event - the festival seems to have learned from the shortage of space last year, so there were still plenty of spots even on Thursday. There'll always be a spot - just don't be afraid to ask the volunteers on the camp sites (and be aware that they're volunteers, and often not very well informed, so be prepared to ask more than one person icon_wink.gif)

You might have a point, from a "Roskilde 2007" google image search :
This looks more like Glastonbury 2005, where a months worth of rain fell in two hours on already wet ground.
http://www.adressa.no/multimedia/archive/01020/Festival_Roskilde__1020548a.jpg
This from a "Glastonbury 2005" google image search:
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/15/22424842_bef76a2ce9.jpg

It feels like we are the only two people on this forum, I mean the Glastonbury boards are quiet, but there are usually at least three of us!!

Interesting that Roskilde also seems to be putting official entertainment on sooner, although they seem to have started this earlier than Glastonbury.

You description on your journey from Glastonbury to Roskilde sounds rather stress free, leaving at around 10am for a 3pm flight from presumably Gatwick, seems nice and easy. However it is very easy for it to take 3-4 hours just to get out of the car parks at Glastonbury leaving at that time, depending on where you are parked and of course the weather conditions. I reckon it would be prudent to leave Sunday night straight after the headliners finish, mind you even that would have been difficult for me in 2004 with Orbital headlining on the Sunday night, maybe leaving 06.00am on the Monday morning maybe possible, once the disco biscuits have worn off. icon_eek.gif icon_eek.gif icon_eek.gif Also I would be tempted to have one good nights sleep at home on the Monday night, time to have a bath and rest before flying out Tuesday morning, surely getting on site at Roskilde by Tuesday afternoon ready to start it all over again. icon_lol.gif icon_lol.gif icon_lol.gif

Interestingly Glastonbury over the last two years have increased the camping area, but the attendance has remained the same to give more space, this is mainly due to the increase in people arriving in huge tents, ie 10 men tent with one or two people in and bringing gazebos also.
Written on: 19.07.2010 18:14
Dunkesen
Posts: 205
worthyraver wrote:

Kaneda wrote:


Roskilde 2007 was probably at least as bad. It was the heaviest rainfall in the festival's 40 year history. Just have a search for "Roskilde 2007" on google image search icon_wink.gif

As for getting from Glastonbury to Roskilde, in 1999 we went by train all the way - Eurostar etc. - and didn't arrive at Roskilde until Wednesday. But then, the camping wasn't quite so raving mad in terms of getting a spot back then *.

Anyway, we took the easy, and not so environmentally friendly, way in 2004 - we went with a friend who lived in London (who was also the one getting the tickets), so we drove there with him.

So, after Glastonbury, we drove off to Gatwick Monday morning, around 10; took a plane around 3 p.m.-ish; arrived in Copenhagen about an hour later; went home to get the prepared fresh clothes etc., then went straight to Roskilde by train (that's about a 30 minute trip). Arrived at the gates to the camping area Monday evening around 9 p.m., having left Glastonbury less than 12 hours earlier - and that was a leisurely trip, without much stress.

The rest of the camp had already arrived and set up for us, so no problem getting a spot **. Quite a few beers later, passed out in the tent and had one of the few occassions of managing to sleep until afternoon next day. icon_smile.gif


* On a side note, you might say that Roskilde puts music on earlier and earlier too. In the 90's, what time people arrived for camping was quite unorganized - some arrived on Thursday, some on the Sunday before, some even earlier. In 2000 (as far as I recall), they added the camping stage, with selected unsigned Nordic bands playing from Tuesday and until the festival site opened. Now they use one of the actual festival stages (Pavilion, re-dubbed Pavilion Junior) for that - and it starts Sunday. Although it's more of a bonus than the one thing people arrive early for. icon_wink.gif And of course, now there's an official opening of the camping sites. It used to be Sunday morning, this year it was Saturday evening. I.e., now the camping opens during Glastonbury.

** And don't worry about that in any event - the festival seems to have learned from the shortage of space last year, so there were still plenty of spots even on Thursday. There'll always be a spot - just don't be afraid to ask the volunteers on the camp sites (and be aware that they're volunteers, and often not very well informed, so be prepared to ask more than one person icon_wink.gif)

You might have a point, from a "Roskilde 2007" google image search :
This looks more like Glastonbury 2005, where a months worth of rain fell in two hours on already wet ground.
http://www.adressa.no/multimedia/archive/01020/Festival_Roskilde__1020548a.jpg
This from a "Glastonbury 2005" google image search:
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/15/22424842_bef76a2ce9.jpg

It feels like we are the only two people on this forum, I mean the Glastonbury boards are quiet, but there are usually at least three of us!!

Interesting that Roskilde also seems to be putting official entertainment on sooner, although they seem to have started this earlier than Glastonbury.

You description on your journey from Glastonbury to Roskilde sounds rather stress free, leaving at around 10am for a 3pm flight from presumably Gatwick, seems nice and easy. However it is very easy for it to take 3-4 hours just to get out of the car parks at Glastonbury leaving at that time, depending on where you are parked and of course the weather conditions. I reckon it would be prudent to leave Sunday night straight after the headliners finish, mind you even that would have been difficult for me in 2004 with Orbital headlining on the Sunday night, maybe leaving 06.00am on the Monday morning maybe possible, once the disco biscuits have worn off. icon_eek.gif icon_eek.gif icon_eek.gif Also I would be tempted to have one good nights sleep at home on the Monday night, time to have a bath and rest before flying out Tuesday morning, surely getting on site at Roskilde by Tuesday afternoon ready to start it all over again. icon_lol.gif icon_lol.gif icon_lol.gif

Interestingly Glastonbury over the last two years have increased the camping area, but the attendance has remained the same to give more space, this is mainly due to the increase in people arriving in huge tents, ie 10 men tent with one or two people in and bringing gazebos also.


You're not the only ones here, I for one am enjoying your conversation as I am really keen on going to Glasto next year!

Do you have any tips for Danes considering Glasto? It seems most people go there by car, how is the public transport situation?
Written on: 19.07.2010 19:02
Kaneda
Posts: 382
worthyraver wrote:
It feels like we are the only two people on this forum, I mean the Glastonbury boards are quiet, but there are usually at least three of us!!


It is a lot more quiet than I remember from previous years. Of course, it's "always" (the few years it's existed) been a rather limited group of regulars (which I'm not, really), with a lot of people writing a single post to ask a question and then disappearing. icon_smile.gif

Maybe it's the hot weather during - and after Roskilde - I'm really mostly here when I'm at work. icon_razz.gif The forum regulars are generally people who've been at the festival, like, forever, so maybe some of them just "gave up" (I believe Saturnus did).

I reckon it would be prudent to leave Sunday night straight after the headliners finish


Might be - it's not a terribly good idea at Roskilde, since that's when most people leave - you'll often get to Copenhagen at the same time as those who left 5 or more hours later. At Glastonbury, we mainly stayed to allow our "designated driver" to get sober. Seemed pretty easy to get away. But then, I think Glastonbury may have changed a lot in terms of audience, much like Roskilde, over the past 3-4 years. Things like, the flag/banner thing only seems to have become a problem in the past few years - judging from what we experienced in 1999 and 2004 - and from concert photos.

Also I would be tempted to have one good nights sleep at home on the Monday night, time to have a bath and rest before flying out Tuesday morning, surely getting on site at Roskilde by Tuesday afternoon ready to start it all over again. icon_lol.gif icon_lol.gif icon_lol.gif


Probably. At 32, now I probably would too. icon_smile.gif

Interestingly Glastonbury over the last two years have increased the camping area, but the attendance has remained the same to give more space, this is mainly due to the increase in people arriving in huge tents, ie 10 men tent with one or two people in and bringing gazebos also.


Well, as you may have seen in other threads, the festival, and especially the camp sites, are constantly threatened by a gravel pit/quarry. Have been for the past many years. So, each year there's a huge hole somewhere on the site - plus a large amount of land that cannot yet be used for camping again. This year, a pleasant side effect of the financial crisis is that the pit for once got smaller - and the festival had prepared with (what they call) extra land which they kept open (P). (But of course, they also had P the year before - it was the closing of that, which caused problems in 2009)

Maps:
2010: http://www.roskilde-festival.dk/fileadmin/user_upload/documents/kort_2010-uk.pdf
2009: http://www.roskilde-festival.dk/fileadmin/user_upload/documents/kort_2009-uk.pdf
2008: http://www.roskilde-festival.dk/fileadmin/user_upload/documents/kort-2008-uk.pdf

The grey area to the South of the festival area is the quarry. In 2002-3 it was around where the Fishing/piss-bathing lakes are now (it's what allowed them to create those).

Ah! And I see Dunkesen is still here. icon_smile.gif I can't (or shouldn't) give any tips about Glastonbury now, though. If I gave tips about Roskilde based on 2004, I'd lead a lot of people astray. icon_wink.gif

ETA: Oh, one more "tip" for Roskilde is that you might want to get a hold of LiamC, who has a lot of experience with getting here icon_smile.gif

[This article was edited 3 times, at last 19.07.2010 at 19:12.]
Written on: 19.07.2010 19:23
Saturnus
Posts: 3047
Kaneda wrote:
This year, a pleasant side effect of the financial crisis is that the pit for once got smaller ...


Uhm, I hate to point out that it has nothing to do with the financial crisis at all. It's just because the gravel pit is almost depleted on the current location on East.
Written on: 19.07.2010 20:51
Kaneda
Posts: 382
Saturnus wrote:

Kaneda wrote:
This year, a pleasant side effect of the financial crisis is that the pit for once got smaller ...


Uhm, I hate to point out that it has nothing to do with the financial crisis at all. It's just because the gravel pit is almost depleted on the current location on East.


Which was ultimately why they (meaning another company than the one digging in East, as far as I recall) were going to make the one on West even bigger this year, and pretty much swallow all of West. Which ended up being postponed, because there was no demand. At least, that's the story everyone, including the festival, ended up with. The pit on East would still have gotten smaller, but West would have been gone entirely.

(The end result is still that there will probably be less space for camping next year, since I wouldn't be surprised if they just keep the current size of East - after all, that's what they intended to do this year).

I know most of us (or myself at least) don't care much about West, but less space there still means less space in East. icon_wink.gif

[This article was edited 4 times, at last 19.07.2010 at 21:09.]
Written on: 20.07.2010 11:09
worthyraver
Posts: 8
Dunkesen wrote:



You're not the only ones here, I for one am enjoying your conversation as I am really keen on going to Glasto next year!

Do you have any tips for Danes considering Glasto? It seems most people go there by car, how is the public transport situation?

First thing to mention about Glastonbury of recent years is the ticketing system this has had a complete overhaul for the better. To even attempt to buy a ticket you need to register, this is straight forward and costs nothing, just go to this site:
http://www.glastonburyregistration.co.uk
Fill in your details and add upload a photo, what this means if you are successful in purchasing a ticket your ticket will arrive with your photo on it, and only the person who's face matches the ticket will be allowed access to Glastonbury Festival. This reduces the availability of tickets on the black market and has been very successful in this respect. Tickets go on sale in October, probably 03 October 2010, and will likely sell on that day in the past they have sold out in under 2 hours and with this year being a scorcher that generally makes things sell faster the following year.

As for getting to Glastonbury, firstly the festival is not actually in Glastonbury it is and 6 miles away in a small village called Pilton. The public transport links to the site considering its remote location and the fact that it is based in the UK are in fact very good, two choices:

Coach:
Combined coach and admission tickets are available on ticket sale day or afterwards if you prefer, coaches leave from all major UK cities and will get you on site on the Wednesday leaving on the Monday. The first years they did this there was major problems, although things have got a lot better and things generally run smoothly now.

Train:
Combined train tickets are also available but these are not usually any cheaper than just booking the train yourself, as long as you do this a few months in advance. Train from Paddington (London) to Castle Cary (closest train station) take about three hours and there is a free shuttle bus from Castle Cary to the site itself, which runs from the first train Wednesday morning throughout the entire festival.

Both the above should give you fairly hassle free entry to the festival, however there are advantages / disadvantages. Using the above methods you with get dropped right at the gates, whereas driving you could easily be parked a mile away from the gates, and that is a long way with all your stuff just to get to the gates, you may then have another 30 minutes walk once inside to your camp site, depending where you choose to camp. That said if you are on the coach / train that limits the amount of things you can bring, I am talking beer/cider/vodka etc. As there is no arena at Glastonbury and you can take as much alcohol in as you can like and you can drink said alcohol wherever you like it is prudent to take in a much as you can. Remember Glastonbury is not in an urban location it is therefore impossible but crates of beer locally. For these reasons the vast majority of people choose to drive and because of the large distance you will have to walk to your camping spot which will be over uneven farm ground it is prudent to bring a trolley for all your beer/cider tents etc. Under no circumstances bring a cheap trolley the paths every year are littered with trolleys that were not up to the job.

Here are my groups trolley(s) from this year:

http://i269.photobucket.com/albums/jj67/mrpeevly/Trolley1.jpg

http://i269.photobucket.com/albums/jj67/mrpeevly/Trolley2.jpg

See you all there!!!
Written on: 20.07.2010 13:23
Kaneda
Posts: 382
Kaneda wrote:
So, after Glastonbury, we drove off to Gatwick Monday morning, around 10; took a plane around 3 p.m.-ish; arrived in Copenhagen about an hour later; went home to get the prepared fresh clothes etc., then went straight to Roskilde by train (that's about a 30 minute trip). Arrived at the gates to the camping area Monday evening around 9 p.m., having left Glastonbury less than 12 hours earlier - and that was a leisurely trip, without much stress.


Just for perfection's sake... That paragraph made little sense to me even when I wrote it, remembering that the whole idea was that we went straight to Roskilde, after getting our stuff - no "relaxing" in Copenhagen. So where did the 5 hours between arriving and reaching Roskilde go? So, consulted someone with a better memory than me. And the answer is that the plane trip takes two hours + "obviously" (well, I forgot) the 1 hour time difference, so we arrived in Copenhagen at around 6 p.m., not 4 p.m. icon_wink.gif About an hour to get home, about half an hour of getting new gear, about 1 1/2 hour to get to the festival.

That's the kind of recollection you get from being wasted over the course of two festivals...

Should have figured some of it out too, since we're going to London tomorrow, and the tickets say the same as then - "1 hour" to get to London, "3 hours" to get back to Copenhagen, but 10 years of various plane travels, and it still confuses me. icon_wink.gif

The end result is the same, though (because at least I remembered approx. when we left Glastonbury and arrived at Roskilde). Can be done in less than 12 hours.

And yeah, might end up convincing some to come along for it again next year (2012 is the next fallow year, right? Rather than 2013, as you write in the first post). So any new tips are appreciated by me too. icon_smile.gif

[This article was edited 6 times, at last 20.07.2010 at 13:33.]
Written on: 20.07.2010 14:28
worthyraver
Posts: 8
Kaneda wrote:

Kaneda wrote:
So, after Glastonbury, we drove off to Gatwick Monday morning, around 10; took a plane around 3 p.m.-ish; arrived in Copenhagen about an hour later; went home to get the prepared fresh clothes etc., then went straight to Roskilde by train (that's about a 30 minute trip). Arrived at the gates to the camping area Monday evening around 9 p.m., having left Glastonbury less than 12 hours earlier - and that was a leisurely trip, without much stress.


Just for perfection's sake... That paragraph made little sense to me even when I wrote it, remembering that the whole idea was that we went straight to Roskilde, after getting our stuff - no "relaxing" in Copenhagen. So where did the 5 hours between arriving and reaching Roskilde go? So, consulted someone with a better memory than me. And the answer is that the plane trip takes two hours + "obviously" (well, I forgot) the 1 hour time difference, so we arrived in Copenhagen at around 6 p.m., not 4 p.m. icon_wink.gif About an hour to get home, about half an hour of getting new gear, about 1 1/2 hour to get to the festival.

That's the kind of recollection you get from being wasted over the course of two festivals...

Should have figured some of it out too, since we're going to London tomorrow, and the tickets say the same as then - "1 hour" to get to London, "3 hours" to get back to Copenhagen, but 10 years of various plane travels, and it still confuses me. icon_wink.gif

The end result is the same, though (because at least I remembered approx. when we left Glastonbury and arrived at Roskilde). Can be done in less than 12 hours.

And yeah, might end up convincing some to come along for it again next year (2012 is the next fallow year, right? Rather than 2013, as you write in the first post). So any new tips are appreciated by me too. icon_smile.gif

I glad we have that sorted out I was getting really worried !!!!

Seriously it does bring it home how quickly the journey can be done if you are "hardcore" enough to go straight from one festival to the next. I would so love to do that next year, but I think financially it will not be tenable which is a shame, a few years ago I would definitely have done it. I have never had a shower at Glastonbury but coming straight to Roskilde from Glastonbury would be a week with no shower at this point I think I would crack and have my first festival shower, or just keep going with the baby wipes and ever increasing amounts of deodorant and aftershave.

The fallow year was due to be next year 2011 but Michael Eavis manage to get the licence changed to have the fallow year in 2012 so as to avoid a clash with the Olympics, so 2013 there will be a festival again, hooorah.

What I should have mentioned in the above post is that this year there was a big change in the opening of Glastonbury, which I would expect to be repeated next year. In 2009 due to the festival for the first time being advertised as a five day festival for the first time an unprecedented number of people turned up on the Wednesday, 100,000 by the end of the day. What this did was created complete grid lock on the surrounding roads, additionally there were some accidents on nearby motorways the upshot being people were queueing for 10 hours or more to get in. To alleviate this in 2010 they allowed the car parks to open on the Tuesday night 09.00pm, (was previously 08.00am Wednesday) thus getting cars off the road, however there was to be no leaving your car or generally being a nuisance. Did the plan work I hear you say, well did it get the cars off the roads pretty much yes, but you knew there was a but coming, once inside the car parks the queueing for the gates was a complete cluster-fuck and I queued for 4 hours to get in, whereas many who turned up long after me walked straight in, very very annoying after all the years they have organising the festival to be caught with their trousers down to such a big extent was very very bad. I would hope that this was a one off, with Glastonbury Festivals being surprised by the amount prepared to wait in their cars all or most of the night and also the world cup was a factor. England had a match at 3.00pm which was shown on the Pyramid stage thus a huge percentage of people wanted to be on site and set up and sat down in front of the screens in plenty of time. I arrived in the car parks at 07.45am (pedestrian gates open 08.00am) and I was in the festival proper at 11.45am, by the time we had set the tents up, we were the advance party so there were a few tents, we just made it for the start of the football.
Written on: 20.07.2010 15:56
Limabeancross
Posts: 1426
Dunkesen wrote:

http://www.adressa.no/multimedia/archive/01020/Festival_Roskilde__1020548a.jpg


That was a nightmare. The photograph is of what is now 'Agora J'. I can see what was our camp on the left hand side (ours is the half empty one just below the two pavillions joined together). We moved to P on the Thursday night incase it got any worse.

Interesting that Glastonbury 2005 was so bad, considering Roskilde 2005 was so nice weather wise.

[This article was edited 2 times, at last 20.07.2010 at 15:59.]
Written on: 20.07.2010 16:40
worthyraver
Posts: 8
LiamC wrote:


That was a nightmare. The photograph is of what is now 'Agora J'. I can see what was our camp on the left hand side (ours is the half empty one just below the two pavillions joined together). We moved to P on the Thursday night incase it got any worse.

Interesting that Glastonbury 2005 was so bad, considering Roskilde 2005 was so nice weather wise.

Apparently the thunderstorm that Glastonbury got in 2005 was some "once in a hundreds years" event, some very usual weather patterns producing a highly localised downpour: 50mm in once hour, that is literally the entire months average rainfall in one hour.

They lost power on the main stages, hundreds of tents washed away, they were close to cancelling the entire festival.

It did not rain again that year though, which was nice. icon_smile.gif
Written on: 20.07.2010 23:52
Kaneda
Posts: 382
worthyraver wrote:
I glad we have that sorted out I was getting really worried !!!!


Well, the more I tried to figure out how it made sense, the more I started to wonder if maybe a whole day had disappeared from my memory, and it took 36 hours to get to Roskilde instead. icon_rolleyes.gif

Festivals fucking up... I guess they all do. Roskilde has its fair share of fuck-ups - seems at least one major one per year - not counting the traditional absolutely-idiotic-choice-of-stage-for-at-least-one-concert.

50mm in once hour, that is literally the entire months average rainfall in one hour.


Wow, Roskilde got 100mm or so in 2007 - but at least that took more than a day to fall. icon_smile.gif
Written on: 21.07.2010 01:22
Coldblooded
Posts: 1229
Kaneda wrote:

worthyraver wrote:
I glad we have that sorted out I was getting really worried !!!!


Well, the more I tried to figure out how it made sense, the more I started to wonder if maybe a whole day had disappeared from my memory, and it took 36 hours to get to Roskilde instead. icon_rolleyes.gif

Festivals fucking up... I guess they all do. Roskilde has its fair share of fuck-ups - seems at least one major one per year - not counting the traditional absolutely-idiotic-choice-of-stage-for-at-least-one-concert.

50mm in once hour, that is literally the entire months average rainfall in one hour.


Wow, Roskilde got 100mm or so in 2007 - but at least that took more than a day to fall. icon_smile.gif

Actually half of the rain fell in one day, but still no match for 50 mm in ONE HOUR. That sounds completely batshit insane.


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